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Cirrhosis of the liver means irreversible destruction of the liver architecture replaced by nodules of fibrosis (scars) as a result to the attempt to repair its chronically damaged state. Mostly due to chronic alcohol abuse, viral hepatitis (B, C, D), or any other chronic liver disease (eg. Wilson's disease,hemochromatosis, drugs overdose, PSC, PBC and so on). Massive acute injury may result in cirrhosis as well. Most common cause in US are alcohol abuse & hepatitis C. Diagnosis usually is by medical history and imaging studies confirm the diagnosis (ultrasound or CT). Clinical presentation is mostly seen by ascites (liquid in the abdomen), esophageal varices (will eventually rupture causing bleeding in 25% of patients; 50% of them will die), caput medusa (dilated veins in the abdomen), jaundice.. Avoid alcohol, get emergency medical help in acute deterioration to manage complications early, and/or to remove excesive liquid on belly, Lactulose is the treatment of choice I think its mostly paliative (supportive), and liver transplant (may be the only guarantee option) the liver is avital organ that we cannot live without one.
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Questions, experiences and reviews (48)

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What's the difference between liver cancer and cirrhosis of the liver?
Is there a difference between liver cancer and cirrhosis of the liver? If so what is it? Someone on here said I am at risk for liver cancer cause of how much I drink but that confused me cause can liver cancer be caused by drinking a lot? I know cirrhosis can be but what about liver cancer? And which hurts more cirrhosis or liver cancer?
Kathy Loris
02/21/11
Reply
  Liver cancer or hepatic cancer is properly considered to be a cancer which starts in the liver.
The most frequent liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (also named hepatoma, which is a misnomer because adenomas are usually benign). This tumor also has a variant type that consists of both HCC and cholangiocarcinoma components. The cells of the bile duct coexist next to the bile ducts that drain the bile produced by the hepatocytes of the liver. Cancers which arise from the blood vessel cells in the liver are known has hemangioendotheliomas.


Cirrhosis is a consequence of chronic liver disease characterized by replacement of liver tissue by fibrosis, scar tissue and regenerative nodules (lumps that occur as a result of a process in which damaged tissue is regenerated), leading to loss of liver function.
Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by alcoholism, hepatitis B and C, and fatty liver disease, but has many other possible causes. Some cases are idiopathic, i.e., of unknown cause.
well wisher
02/21/11
Are there any natural or home remedies for cirrhosis/ liver failure?
My mom has been an alcoholic for 25 years. She has been diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver. We don't know the severity of the cirrhosis because they cannot biopsy her liver because her blood is no longer clotting and she will bleed out and die. Upon her release from the hospital the doctor told her that there is nothing they can do for her and that her liver is " fried'. She has since quit drinking, but I think she already has liver failure. Her eyes are neon yellow. Her hairline has a yellow line and her skin and nail beds are yellow. I just can't give up and watch my mother die. There has to be something that prolong her life and help repair her liver. Please help, my family and I are desperate! Thank you in advance.
Kornbreadfedmama
06/26/09
Reply
  I was told the same thing about my liver 5 years ago. I'm sorry your mother is so sick, but there is nothing she or anyone else can do for her at this late stage. Only a transplant will save her life, and it seems as though that is not an option since her doctor never mentioned it.

Her liver function is very low with 25 years of drinking which caused the cirrhosis. If she is no longer clotting well and yellow, then the disease is probably in the end stage. The disease will progress to total liver failure whether she drinks or doesn't drink. Not drinking can slow it down, but it won't stop it at this point.

I don't know whether or not a transplant could be an option for her, but she could call a transplant center and find out what she has to do in order to qualify. I know they require at least 6 months of proven sobriety before they will even consider you. Then you have to go through an evaluation after the 6 months. The problem is that with many alcoholics, they don't have 6 months left or are too sick to withstand the surgery. This is probably the case with your mom. I think your family is going to have to prepare yourselves for the worst if she cannot get a transplant. So sorry.
Baa Baa
06/26/09
My dad has End-stage Liver disease/ liver failure (Cirrhosis) How long does he have?
My family seems to be keeping a lot of information from me about his illness. I went to the hospital a few days ago and I really didn't find out much. We are working really hard to get him a transplant and I just moved out of state to be with him during this ordeal.

I may not want to know..but, how long do people normally live when they have Cirrhosis/Liver failure?
Sarah
10/14/08
Reply
  The timing can be tricky. It depends on how bad he is or how bad he is treated in the hospital. I would fight and fight for the transplant before he is no longer allowed one. When they get too sick they normally think the patient can't survive and they don't want to waste a liver on them. Sucks, that happen to my dad after his newer liver started failing. To learn more, I would search it online on Wikipedia.com. When everything was happening to my dad no one would tell us details about his illness and that totally sucked. I only learned once I was in Sonography College in great detail. Good luck it can be a long bumpy ride.
Sonographer
10/14/08
how long a person with compensated cirrhosis of the liver can live?
i'VE BEEN DIAGDOSED WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C AND COMPENSATED CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER I AM A MALE 31 Y/O . TREATMENT FOR HEP C DID NOT WORK FOR ME (( PEGINTRON , REBETOL )
Danfer S
11/14/09
Reply
  I'm sorry that treatment did not work for you. It all depends on how aggressive your hep C might be in it's attack on your liver. Your doctor that treated you for the hep C might be able to give you a time frame on how long it might take. Are you being considered for transplant yet? Cirrhosis has 3 stages- A is compensated cirrhosis. B is the beginning of decompensation where you need medications to control your symptoms. C is decompensated where the medications do not work very well anymore and total failure is near.

I had cirrhosis and was in stage B when I was given an estimate of 5 years left, but my cirrhosis was from primary biliary disease which is much different than hep C. I would suggest you talk to your doctor and ask him/her and also ask about the future possibility of transplant if you haven't already discussed this. You're young yet and would probably be an excellent candidate for a transplant at some time in the future. Of course, that would probably be way off in the future, probably many years since you are still in the compensated stage, but it's good to find out things and educate yourself especially when it is your own health.
Baa Baa
11/15/09
What are the causes of liver cirrhosis or cancer?
Alcohol is largely to blame for liver cirrhosis but my friend hasn't really abused it yet he got the ailment. What might have caused it besides alcohol abuse? He's skin and bones right now and deteriorating fast. Please add curative suggestions if any. His doctor sent him home as a hopeless case so i'm appealing for any other remedies. Thank you
tomatoes
11/16/06
Reply
  I'm going through the same thing with my husband. He just came home Tuesday night and I have hospice helping out. He is already getting to where he can't walk hardly. People keep talking about a liver transplant but my doc. said my husband wasn't a candidate because he has cancer. But my husband drank alot when he was younger. He has been on alot of pain medicines. Along with meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. I think the cholesterol drugs caused this cirrohsis. He was taking to much at one time but thats what the doctor told him and it started scarring his liver. And later they changed it and he started getting jaundice and thats how they found the cancer. He also has blood clots from his heart to his liver. His liver isn't functioning right along with his kidneys. I wish you luck with your friend.
Tomtabear
11/17/06
Prevalence of cirrhosis/liver disease in Japan?
Does anyone know the prevalence of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis in Japan? I can't seem to find it anywhere. If you have an internet source confirming it, that would be great. Thanks.
lickamaloin
12/11/06
Reply
  I found this article about cirrhosis in Japan... (the web url got cut off...it's one website, so you have to connect the two parts!)

http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/ cgi/content/abstract/20/4/921


I hope it helped?!
honey(*_*)
12/12/06
How long can Lactulose work for someone with end-stage liver cirrhosis?
Sorry I ask so many questions about this, but I'm really confused, because one minute my Grandfather looks near death, and then he can get out of bed and wheel himself to the bathroom. There is however blood in his stool...what would happen if this happened daily? How long can lactulose work in a patient with the final stage of liver cirrhosis? A few months? A few weeks?
drummer
05/19/10
Reply
  Lactulose is used to get rid of ammonia for people with cirrhosis. It will work as long as the patient takes it. The ammonia is removed through bowel movements. High ammonia levels can cause a condition called encephalopathy which causes confusion, memory loss, behavior changes, hallucinations, and even coma and death if the levels get super high with no treatment. Of course, Lactulose also can cause a lot of diarrhea since that is the side effect.

If your grandfather has continued bleeding day after day, he could get anemic from the blood loss. Cirrhosis causes lots of problems with bleeding. Unwanted veins grow called varix that can leak and bleed. Blood doesn't clot like it should. Any bleeding can be hard to stop. They bruise very easy. It's all part of the disease which is especially true when a person is in the end stage of the disease. Your grandfather can take the Lactulose as long as he is alive. The doctors usually increase the dosage if the ammonia levels continue to go up.
Baa Baa
05/19/10
Stage 4 liver failure, high ammonia levels, cirrhosis, death?
A 59 year-old alcoholic/drug addict (recovering) is in the ICU with stage 4 liver failure and high ammonia levels, the toxins in his bloods are starting to poison him and he is confused. This is one of multiple hospitalizations due to cirrhosis/liver issues.

...What does this mean? Is there a chance this man will live?
It's my Uncle. He has been drinking for nearly 40 years and smoking dope for almost 30. When he found out he had Hep C a few years ago, he tried to get sober, but um, it hasn't been going real well, he just earned his one month sobriety medallion in AA.
sammy
12/07/10
Reply
Very early signs & symptoms of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis?
I've been being studied because I have elevated liver enzymes, I've had a CT scan and an ultrasound that have come back both normal. So we went to the next step and did a liver biopsy. All that came back on that is it showed a mildly inflamed liver but not signs of fibrosis or cirrhosis and my liver had no scarring what-so-ever. But because of my blood work, they want to treat me for PBC. The doctor wants to put me on a medication "just in case" it is PBC but my husband (and I agree with my husband) wants me to get a 2nd opinion by a homeopathic doctor. I've already spoke with one who actually has helped others in my family. My sister-in-law is off all medications she was on and actually lost 23 lbs. by just changing her diet. She, too, had elevated liver enzymes and now they are back to normal. I'm kinda stuck between a rock and a hard place cause I just don't know if I should take the med or not. I've probably had this problem for about 2 to 3 years so I'm thinking what's another couple month to try to rule it out with natural remedies.....Any suggestions?
Mina Daigle
05/15/11
Reply
  Hi Mina,
You weren't specific as to how you were diagnosed, but I can only suspect you had high Alkaline Phos test and a positive AMA or anti-mitochondrial antibody. These are the hallmark blood tests which indicate PBC, along with a high sed rate (ESR) and GGT. It is great that your biopsy is not showing any damage, yet. Keep in mind that a biopsy is a small portion of a particular location of your liver. It is possible that a biopsy of a different location may tell a different story. If you want to talk to some folks that are familiar with the disease, symptoms and diagnosis, you should join the yahoo page on pbc. I have been a member since diagnosed with pbc and they are fabulous. It is true that some do not have symptoms despite advanced liver disease, while some have symptoms before significant damage. Itching, fatigue and other inflammatory symptoms seem to be the most common. I was in the same boat as you and reluctant to take Ursodiol; however, I did a lot of research and joined the yahoo group as well as a facebook group and in the end....decided not taking it was a risk I wasn't willing to take. It is a personal decision. The yahoo group is at http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/PBC_Digest/ Good Luck!!
tanya
05/17/11
What can cause sudden elevation of liver levels in a primary biliary cirrhosis pt on meds?
I have primary biliary cirrhosis (and also have auto immune disease)for 7 years now and have been maintained on medication. I recently switched one of my meds to a generic due to insurance reasons.My bloodwork was PERFECT 5 weeks ago, as it has been for the most part for 7 years. Then just last week I had my bloodwork done again and the LIVER LEVELS have elevated out of the blue. My dr. doesnt think its the medication switch.What else can it be??
Rain
12/15/09
Reply
  I don't agree with your doctor if your levels have been good all this time and suddenly when you change meds to generic, they go up. I have primary biliary cirrhosis too. Well, not the cirrhosis part now since mine was so bad that I had to get a transplant, but I still have the primary biliary disease. I know that my transplant doctors want me to get lab work done every week when my insurance is going to force me to take generic anti rejection drugs instead of name brand. I haven't done it yet, but it will be soon.

Are you taking Ursodiol? Is that the drug that was switched? My levels started to rise once and they put me on the Urso and they came down right away. Most people with PBC does take Urso. The reason my enzymes went up was due to a small bile duct blockage. At least that is what they told me. Personally, I think it was my primary biliary disease trying to attack my new liver after transplant. Urso thins out the bile which really works well in some people like myself. You could have a bile blockage, but it seems to be too coincidental that this happened just as you changed your med to generic. Sometimes generic is not the best even though the insurance people will argue with you on that forever. One sure way to tell is to take the name brand again that you were taking and see if the levels go back down again.
Baa Baa
12/15/09
Mom has cirrhosis of the liver need to know if shes taking the right medicine's?
My mom is 85 years of age she has cirrhosis’ of the liver, diabetes and high blood pressure. She use to be energetic now she is weak and tired all the time. Her doctor prescribed Onglyza, Amlodipine, metporolol, lirnopril.hctz, two of these say do not take if you have liver disease which mom has, need to know if this Doctor is doing right by my mom.
Thank You
cat62
03/07/10
Reply
  Your mother should be seeing either an gastroenterologist or hepatologist now. They should be working with her primary care doctor to be sure any medications she is taking is necessary and if any need to be changed because of the cirrhosis.
All drugs have side effects and warnings. The doctor has to weigh the pros and cons of any medications taken based on her medical history and her diseases. Sometimes the pros outweigh the cons of using a drug. Whatever doctor she is with, they should all know the drugs she is on, why she is on them, and be asked if they are necessary or if something else, that is less harmful, is available for her to take. This isn't something that can be done here...for it will depend on what her blood tests show, how far advanced in the disease she is, whether she is responding to treatment given and other things.
All liver patients are told not to take any medications that are not prescribed or approved of by their doctors. This includes over the counter, herbs, vitamins, minerals,
and supplements. That is because all medications go through the liver first, to be broken down, before going to the rest of the body.

In Cirrhosis, the patient is extremely tired. The body is trying to compensate for the liver functions declining because the liver cells have died off. The body is trying to keep homeostasis in other organs by compensating for the liver lack of function.

When the liver cells become damaged, the immune system of the body responds to this damage and causes inflammation to develop inside the liver which causes the liver to enlarge in size. When the inflammation continues on, the liver cells die
off and form scar tissue inside the liver that blocks the flow of blood through the liver on its way back to the heart and also blocks the flow of blood to the cells left, and they continue to die off...this is cirrhosis.

The liver is normally soft in texture and smooth, with inflammation it enlarges and becomes spongy. When the cells die off, it starts to shrink and become hard...the liver is dying. The blood that normally would flow through the liver, from the portal vein,
backs up and causes high pressure inside the portal vein (known as portal hypertension)..it also backs up into smaller vessels that may have weak spots and balloon outward and bleed. Any blood
in vomit or in the rectal area is an emergency.
The doctor can go in an band them right away to stop the bleeding. Because the blood backs up, it will also back up into the spleen and the spleen will enlarge in size. Her blood tests will show if her Red blood cells level or platelets are decreasing because of this. The Red blood cells is what carries the oxygen molecule around our bodies...lack of oxygen can also cause tiredness if the patient has anemia.
There is also the complication of Encephalopathy.
When our bodies uses protein...there is a byproduct produced from this...known as Ammonia. The liver normally takes this ammonia and converts it into urea
so the body can dispose of it. Now, since the liver isn't able to do this...this ammonia stays in the blood and goes pass the blood brain barrier and into the brain.
It causes confusion, disorientation, personality changes, sleep pattern changes, and tremors. The doctor can start the patient on medications to remove the ammonia known as Lactulose. It is important that the medication is taken, as the patient can eventually go into a coma because of it. The liver normally would handle all toxins in the body and make then into a non toxic form so the body would
dispose of them...but now they are in the blood and this can make a patient extremely itchy and more tired.
Patients can also develop a condition known as Ascites which is a build up of fluid in the abdominal area. This is because the liver isn't able to make a protein efficiently any more, known as Albumin. Albumin is what keeps the fluid inside our vessels. These fluids now seep out and collect here. The doctor can remove these fluid
with a procedure known as paracentesis. It will normally help the patient to breathe better, rest better, and relieve the pain of pressure on the other organs like the stomach that may make them not to want to eat. If the patient isn't eatting, it is best to ask the doctor what supplements she
can be given to keep her strength up.
Considering your mom is 85 years old. You might want to contact the Area of the AGing in your area. They give alot of help to people in this age group who are disabled.
If she wants continue care at home and the doctor thinks she may not live pass 6 months, you might ask him to sign forms so hospice care can be given to her at home.

I know how hard it is to try to be sure she is given the best care. She is fortunate to have someone that cares so much to help her through this. I'm going to give you links that will help explain more about cirrhosis and a link to a support group that are also for caregivers who take care of Cirrhosis patients. Just tell them you are a caregiver for one.
You can click on these links:
http://www.medicinenet.com/cirrhosis/article.htm
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cirrhosis/DS00373
http://yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com/cirrhosis.html
http://www.uihealthcare.com/topics/medicaldepartments/internalmedicine/liverdisease/index.html
The support group is completely free. You can ask questions here, meet others who have cirrhosis, make friends, and see more links about the disease. Here is a link to the site if you think you might be interested:
http://health.dir.groups.yahoo.com/group/livercirrhosissupport/?v=1&t=directory&ch=web&pub=groups&sec=dir&slk=3
Best wishes to you and your mother
abijann
03/07/10
My uncle has hepatitis B and now suffering from liver cirrhosis.His viral load started at 63 million.?
His viral load is originally 63 million and went down to 123 thousand after being put on a medication called entecavir for a year.The last result of his lab test is saying its undetectable.What does it mean?Is it gonna slow down the progression of his cirrhosis?
pinoyako
08/27/08
Reply
  It means it slows down the progression of his hepatitis B and of his cirrhosis. That is if his cirrhosis has not progressed to far. Also, following a healthy diet and avoiding alcohol are essential because the body needs all the nutrients it can get, and alcohol will only lead to more liver damage. Light physical activity can help stop or delay cirrhosis as well.

I have gone through years of HCV and cirrhosis. I had a liver transplant two years ago. Recovery is not always swift, but being alive is a good thing.
ijc
08/27/08
Can you die suddenly from liver cirrhosis?
I've just found out that my best friend has died, apparently of cirrhosis of the liver. He was only 39. I hadn't talked to him for a few months, as we live halfway across the world from each other, but the last time I talked to him he sounded alright and did not mention anything to me about being ill. I know that he had been drinking quite excessively, but I had NO idea he was drinking as much as apparently he had. From what his sister has said, he called 911 on a Monday, vomiting blood and having breathing trouble, by Monday night he was considered brain dead and by Tuesday he had died. Could he have known how ill he was? He hated doctors, so I don't know if he'd seen one prior or not. How could he have died so suddenly? Surely, if he were so ill he were about to die, he would have been ill enough to have been hospitalised before it got so bad he called 911...? I'm left with too many unanswered questions, but I was just wondering if any of you out there know anything, thanks.
heather g
06/11/07
Reply
  yes, you absolutely can die suddenly from cirrhosis of the liver. What happens is the liver just fails suddenly from the disease. When the liver fails it affects every organ in the body. He may have known he was ill, but perhaps he thought he Wasn't that bad off. I'm sorry for you because I know it's painful losing someone you love.

alcohol causes more death than any other drug and people still do not recognize the seriousness of consuming large amounts of alcohol.
Cherokee Billie
06/11/07
Moms close to dying from Cirrhosis, Liver Cancer why so much pain?
My mother has Cirrhosis, Liver Cancer. She was doing pretty good then last night she went down hill fast and she is in a LOT of pain. They are giving her liquid morphine it helps some. What I was wanted to know is why does this cause her so much pain. Hearing her in so much misery and thinking what she is feeling scares so bad. We are having the Reverend Beatty come over to help mom feel more at ease and to help her make peae with God.
Yes she is on hospice. The nurse will come in the morning and from afternoon to evening my step-sister who is a home nurse will be there the during the night my aunt will be there she is also a home nurse. My brother comes over too he is a RN is an assistant professor and has bachelors degree in nuring, and a masters degree in science. Someone is always there with her and dad.
tiedmind
01/24/07
Reply
  This link explains it: http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/help/default.asp?page=5883

So sorry to hear about your Mum.
omicron
01/24/07
What is a realistic prognosis for stage 3 primary liver cancer?
My brother, age 50, has advanced hepatitis C and liver cirrhosis. He has now been diagnosed with stage 3 primary liver cancer. Surgery is not an option. His abdominal cavity continues to fill with fluid which is removed about twice a week. What is a realistic life expectancy?
Teacher20
03/07/10
Reply
  I’m sorry but it doesn’t really matter if the cancer metastasizes to a distant site nor will diet or exercise make a difference. When he feels like eating he should eat whatever he wants. Although treatment may prolong life in an individual patient it does not increase the median survival. What really matters is if there is vein involvement, he will last longer if there is not. A realistic range is about 3-7 months. At this point what is important is keeping him comfortable. You may want to talk to his doctor about hospice. Their main focus is supportive care to give him the best quality of life, pain management and to assist him and the family through this process. Best wishes to you both.
Denisedds
03/08/10
does anyone knows the effects of cinnamon on a cirrhosis liver?
patty g
02/04/10
Reply
  I cannot tell you for certain what effect it has on a patient who has cirrhosis. I do believe that the patient doesn't consume enough cinnamon to be concerned about.

Cinnamon has many beneficial effects for the human body...(they have found that it keeps sugar levels lower in those who have diabetes; of which people who have Cirrhosis are at risk to have or develop).
However, after studying into this a little further...there is evidence that cassia bark, which is one of the four species of cinnamon, may have a high coumarin content. According to these sites...
this could have a moderately toxic effect to the liver and kidneys.
It also said about Vit K being blocked
by coumarin...Vitamin K is what helps the blood to clot. Patients who have Cirrhosis of the liver...the liver is no longer able to make clotting factors efficiently. Blocking the Vit K can cause them to bleed or bruise
much more easily.

You can read about this in wikipedia in two places
The first is on Cinnamon, the other is on Coumarin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnamon
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coumarin

I would definitely check with this patients doctor and see what he has to say about over consumption of Cinnamon in a cirrhosis patient. Very interesting.
abijann
02/07/10
Cirrhosis/Liver disease life expectancy. Please help???
Does anyone kow the life expectancy of someone in the late stages of cirrhosis?
My mom is very ill, she is a chronic alcoholic. She stopped drinking last week, but was diagnosed with cirrhosis many years ago.
I need to know if anyone has been through this and knows what I can expect.

She is jaundice, and in the past week has had high levels of amonia in her blood, also, she vomits all the time, can barely keep anything down.
Today she is having her stomach drained again, this will make the 4th time, fluid builds up in her uppper stomanch area, and it makes it very uncomforatable for her. He legs also are very swollen today (ankles) she cannot walk she is so week. She went from wieighin 145 pounds to now about 98 in a matter of 3 months. I am afraid that it is too late. She has been admitted to the hospital so much that now the Hospitals now just say that the damage is done, they cannot help her. Last year she was in ICU - .......please give me any opinions you may have.
Tracy L
05/22/07
Reply
  There are a few things that I know to give you
as information. (you might already know this) The best doctor to have for
a patient with cirrhosis is a Hepatologist.
She can be given medication to bind the ammonia in her blood to be eliminated from the
body which should help to clear her mind some. She could be placed on diuretics, like
Lasix and Spirolactone to help relieve the sodium content in her blood and also
remove some of the fluid and help keep it from
coming back so fast. If they take alot of fluid
from her abdomen, they might give her
albumin, a Protein. The fact that she did
not stop drinking alcohol, may mean she cannot
be placed on the transplant list for a donor
organ because they usually request that the
patient be free of alcohol for about six months.

With what you have stated that her condition is
now, it doesn't look promising...but I would
not give up. The doctors look at many things
considering a patient: whether they have a
strong, well beating heart, whether they can
withstand a long surgery, whether they have
cirrhosis in one area of the liver or throughout,
whether they have love and support of family
and friends, and how much a person truly
wants to live,etc. Ascites( fluid in the abdominal
area) and Encephalopathy (memory, and mental
confusion problems caused by toxins) and
the fact that she drank clear up to a week ago..
means that the end is in site.....She may last
a long time this way or depending on what I
have stated above...it could be very short.
Each person's body chemistry, diseases,
and conditions are unique and have to be
evaluated to see what may be in the future.
If you have an advanced directive with your
Mom signature on it, you may be able to
talk with her doctors and get her medical
records and have a second opinion and also
be able to answer for her since she might
not be able to answer for herself. There are
free forms on the internet according to your
state. It should be signed in front of two
witnesses, but a notary can stamp it and make
if valid. I hope this info is of some help to you.
It is sad that a daughter has to watch all this
happen to a mother they love...as long as
you are able to be there with her, she will
have peace in knowing that you really care.

You asked what you can expect. There are
a few things that may take place: her heart
may start to beat irregular. If you get her
blood work results, if the sodium and potassium
levels are either too high or too low, this
will cause an irregular beat and is an
emergency. If she starts to cough up blood and
not just vomit (it may look like coffee grounds,
or a darker color) this is also an emergency
cause she could be bleeding internally. If she
feel faint and goes into a coma...there may be
little chance she will come out of it without the
doctors help. What can you do? be there for
her so she doesn't feel alone. Watch for
any of these signs above and keep a record
of how she is feeling day to day and let the
doctor know what exactly is happening with her.
Be with her at all her doctor appointments so
that you can be sure she is taking medication
right and doesn't get so confused she puts
herself in more danger. She might not be
able to break the habit of alcohol especially
since she has been so sick, but knowing that
others understand and will try to help her in
anyway despite of this all, may give her the
strength she needs to try.
abijann
05/22/07
final stage of cirrhosis liver?
can you still get a liver transplant if you are in the final stage of cirrosis of the liver
Interstate Granite
08/30/11
Reply
  Most people who are in the last stage of cirrhosis receive a transplant before others because the sickest people go first in receiving the donated organs. As long as you have been evaluated and placed on the waiting list and are healthy enough to survive the surgery, the answer is yes, you can get a transplant.

Everyone on the waiting list is given what is called a MELD (model for end stage liver disease) score which goes up to 40 which 40 is the sickest. The score is based on the results of 4 blood tests that shows how close to total liver failure you are at the time. When an organ is donated, the person with the highest meld score that is a match to the donor will be the one to receive the transplant. I have seen them transplant some very sick people. The doctors will decide whether or not they think you can survive the surgery. Those people in the final stage would most likely be at the top of the list and the closest ones to getting the donated organs. People in the earlier stages of cirrhosis usually have to wait until they are sick enough to get to the top of the list. The chances of anyone who is in the last stage that has been placed on the waiting list are very good that they will receive their transplant very soon.
Baa Baa
08/30/11
My mom has PBC a rare liver disease, has any1 known any1 that has it and do you know how serious it is?
I am really worried. It's called Primary Bilary Cirrhosis
msdood1
07/26/07
Reply
  Try this website for good info:
www.mayoclinic.com
Cracker Jax
07/26/07
i have primary biliary cirrhosis am i entitled to a flu vaccination?
I have the above liver disease but in the early stages and would like to know if i am entitled to receive the flu vaccination
JB
01/19/11
Reply
My daughter had a liver transplant 6.5 years and her autoimmune hepatitis has come back. Why and how??
She was 26 when she had her trransplant because of autoimmune hepatitis and cirrhosis. She has monthly lab work and her last "numbers" were in the 400's and they should be in the 20's for 30's. She takes 12 Prograff pills a day and was just started again on Rapamune (sp??) and steroids. I don't know the dosage. She says she is not drinking alcohol and has felt pretty good-she had no idea til Tuesday about the abnormal "numbers.". She has lab work monthly and had a liver biopsy on Halloween. Is there specific things she needs to be doing--better diet, more rest, less stress, etc that she needs to follow? She was planning her wedding for next April but doesn't want to go thru with it if she's going to be sick again.
Sharon L
11/03/06
Reply
  There are a couple natural supplements that has helped liver enzymes drop significantly. One particular case they dropped from 800 to 34 by taking two each of NutriFeron and Liver DTX Complex.

Liver DTX Complex is a botanical blend that promotes liver health. Plant-based healers such as milk thistle seed extract, dandelion, and turmeric help flush out toxins, thwart free radicals, and support liver regeneration.

Nutriferon is a clinically proven blend of immune-strengthening plant extracts. It strengthens immune response by boosting the body's natural interferon. It was created by Dr. Kojima the discoverer of interferon that naturally increases the production of interferon in the body.

Hope this is helpful and feel free to contact me with questions.
JustMe
11/04/06
I have primary biliary cirrhosis and overlap/crossover syndrome?
I would like to know if any one else out there has the cross over bit as there is little or no literature on this as it is relatively rare, or so I am told! Is there anything I can be advised of that might help.
Meds are Ursodeoxycholic Acid, Mycophenolate Mofetil.
Please this is a serious question and I would like a little respect on this one. thank you x
Thankyou for that. I have looked at the web site. I have multiple connective tissue disorders but nothing mentions about liver overlap. I will email them. thanks again
Double Diamonds
04/13/08
Reply
  It's pretty rare: about 1% of the US population is affected. I'm sure there is some form of organization which helps but I really don't know.

I really have no idea what to tell you that you don't already know. You could look at this slideshow: it summarizes it quite simply and might help you in explaining it to others. http://www.myositis.org/pdf/CONF04/Myositis_overlaps_8-2004.pdf

Good luck, I hope someone can help.
Confused
04/14/08
Can I get a handicap parking placard for Primary Biliary cirrhosis?
I have just been diagnosed with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis as well as Sjogrens Syndrome. I was wondering if anyone knows if it is possible to obtain a handicap parking placard in the state of California for these issues?
kiki's moving
12/29/08
Reply
  Handicapped parking is for people that cannot walk very far and needs closer to the entrance or for someone in a wheelchair that needs the extra room for getting in and out of a vehicle.

I had primary biliary cirrhosis and never used handicapped parking until AFTER I received my transplant. There should not be any reason you need handicapped parking with PBC since it does not take away your ability to walk or even make you out of breathe.

I had to use handicapped parking for a few months after my transplant since it took me a long time to get back on my feet again. I don't know what Sjogrens Syndrome is so I don't know if that limits you in some way or not.

I guess the answer to your question is to ask yourself, "Can I walk to the store without a problem?" If the answer is yes, then you don't need handicapped parking even though I know you probably would like to have one of those placards just for the convenience of easy parking. Leave it for the people that really need it if you can.
Baa Baa
12/30/08
liver cancer?
Can a person have cancer in the liver when blood test for liver comes back normal? I have lesions, need biopsy and am considering not having it done.
Thanks for the advice so far, but honestly cancer in the liver is pretty much fatal. If it's there, it's there. I don't want to go through a biopsy again. Had one in a different spot toward the end of last year. I'm drained.
Flavorsplash
05/06/07
Reply
  Please go have the tests immediately,this is your life you are dealing with.
Cinna
05/06/07
What is the best approach in treating early heptocellular carcinoma with chronic hepatitis B infection?
the patient has no sign and symptoms of liver insufficiency.
HCC diagnosed during screening --alpha feto protein levels > 1500 units..
USG shows no SOL apart from early cirrhosis.
TECE for 2 times ..both films show no SOL nor lopoidol uptake.nor undue vascularity.
After 2 TACE.. alpha feto levels now 130 units
What are the possibilities of this condition and
what are the differentials.?
other systems .. including genital system..NAD
mrbusybee
07/30/06
Reply
  Read up on glyconutrient technology.

That information is on my page and blog roll.
sugars_that_heal
07/31/06
How much copper in 100mg of liver powder?
I just started taking Vitamin B complex when I realized there are 100 mg of liver powder in it. I'm not allowed to eat foods high in copper because it severely damages my health, and liver has the most copper.
How much copper is in 100 mg of liver powder? Is it a lot, or a little?
Kitty Chow
04/23/10
Reply
  Liver is a source of copper. Typically for calf liver, the copper content might be around 12g/100g acording to one source [ http://www.provet.co.uk/petfacts/healthtips/copperinfood.htm ], this would work out around 12mg/100mg. When you say your vitamin B complex has 100mg of liver powder in it, you didn't specify for what amount of Brewer's Yeast. But assuming your typical daily dosage has 100mg liver then you would be ingesting around 12mg copper.

If you are to avoid copper then it would be better to purchase a liver-free vegetarian source of vitamin B complex. So it would be wise to stop taking that one you have. Give it away to someone who doesn't have a problem with ingesting copper. A time release format is also a good way to take B complex as B vitamins, as with vitamin C, get excreted fairly rapidly.

Best wishes.
j cat ♥❣¸¸.•´´❀¯`•• .¸¸❣♥ قطة j
04/25/10
Question about pegasys/copegus treatment and liver enzyme levels?
genotype 1a and have been on treatments for 7 months. ive been undetectable since month 4 but my liver enzymes are still in the mid hundreds and my hemoglobin is 9.4. the pre-treatment biopsy showed stage 2 liver disease. does this mean my liver isnt healing, and why arent my enzymes down if the treatment is working?

i dont take acetominophen and i only drink water and juice. i see the doc next week.
GrundleGoat
01/28/09
Reply
  I've heard that it takes about a year to get the enzymes to normal.

I used to be a lab tech and the one thing I know for sure is that your hemoglobin is a bit low. Talk to the doc about that. Vitamins will help.

Good Luck Sweetie, I know you have been through a lot with this. It ain't easy. xoxo
Just Tink
01/28/09
How reliable are liver blood tests?
Several years ago I was diagnosed with fatty liver. I lost 50 pounds but was having abdominal pain so I had a liver blood test done which came out normal. However, I am still having abdominal pain. Is there any possibility that the liver test could be wrong?
goldilocks
05/29/08
Reply
  No blood testing is 100% accurate.
It depends alot on how they do the testing,
who does the testings, etc.

The doctors usually do more testing in
a certain period of time, to be sure of
the results.

However, abdominal pain can come from
many different things. Usually with liver
problems the liver has inflammation.
Some people feel pressure on the right
side under the rib area or they might feel
an ache there. Others have pain more
over toward the right-center side, if
they have gallbladder problems.
People who have lost weight fast and who
have cholesterol problems, can develop
gallstones. The liver enlargement and
gallstones problems can be diagnosed
if you have an ultrasound done.
People can also have stomach problems
like gastritis, acid reflux, heartburn, etc.
Here is a very reliable site where you
can read about different conditions and
maybe you will be able to pin point one
as being your situation. Only the doctor
can diagnose what your real problem is,
though..wish I could be more of help.
http://www.gihealth.com/html/education/pamphlets.html

Please check with your doctor, considering
you were diagnosed with a fatty liver,
to be sure if you can take medication to
help your stomach. Most all medication
goes through the liver first and has to be
adjusted if the liver does have a problem and to be sure it does not become toxic
to the liver.
Here is another link about fatty liver, if
you are searching for a good one that
explains everything:
http://www.medicinenet.com/fatty_liver/article.htm
abijann
05/29/08
Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease... help please!?
Hi, I have just had an ultrasound of my liver and have been told that it is very enlarged and that I have Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, due to my Insulin Resistance. I am only 20 years old, and they were really worried at how fast it had progressed and how enlarged my liver was considering my age. I am overweight but not obese.

Does this mean that my liver has been damaged already? Can this lead to serious problems?
I have been feeling tired and fatigued for a couple of years now, do you think this could be the cause?

If anyone has any information on this I would really appreciate it.
I have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome hence the insulin resistance... so yes I have hormone imbalances etc. but I do eat fairly healthily.
I'm not looking for dietary advice
loveandlaughter
09/24/10
Reply
How bad a disease is non alcoholic fatty liver disease?
I am 21 and weigh 325 pounds. I have just been diagnosed with non alcoholic fatty liver disease. From what the doc has told me, my liver is about 12% heavier than it should be. He also said that it is obviously much larger than it should be but luckily, I don't have any liver scarring yet.
Jonny
11/25/07
Reply
  If you've been diagnosed with NAFLD it is a little different than the previous answer given who suggested NASH. NAFLD is when you have just a fatty liver, NASH is when the fatty liver has inflammation. Which you still may have. NAFLD can progress to NASH.
NAFLD is the most common cause of elevated liver tests. Fatty liver is the accumulation of triglycerides and other fats in the liver cells. In some patients, this may be accompanied by hepatic inflammation.
NAFLD is found in over 80% of patients who are obese. Fortunately, NAFLD is not normally life threatening and is reversible unless it progresses to a more severe stage of liver disease. So losing weight and keeping it off will improve your condition.
I wish you well and hope this helped.
Dr Joe Blow
11/25/07
primary biliary cirrhosis if you have it would like to know if you can help me?
benton
09/15/07
Reply
  Perhaps just ask the question, and I'll see if I can help.
huggz
09/16/07
I have Primary Biliary Cirrhosis would like to know what to expect?
benton
09/15/07
Reply
  I would expect you to go to mayoclinic.com, learn some more about it, and try get an appointment with a Doctor there. This is a diagnosis that requires an expert on it.
jorge f
09/15/07
How much tylenol does it take to damage your liver?
I have been on Lortabs for a couple of years now, and I take 10-12 pills a day, At 500 mg of Acetaminophen per tablet, that is a daily in take of about 5,500 mg of tylenol a day . With that amount how long if any will it take to damage my liver and how will I know that liver damage has set in.
Todd P
04/04/07
Reply
  The maximum recommended dose would be 4000mg/day. If you are exceeding this, you might be injuring your liver. Don't you have concerns about taking an overdose of narcotics and tylenol?? If your liver gets hurt, in general, you do not get a new one. Get help with your drug habit, and ask that your liver function get checked. Be responsible!!
David B
04/04/07
primary biliary cirrhosis:best treatment options?
prognostic indicators
Rachel
06/30/06
Reply
  well the treatment is aimed at the cause of the cirrhosis in an attempt to prevent further liver damage. Adequate rest and diet are essential, as is restriction of alcohol. Vitamin and mineral supplements may be prescribed,,,,the prognosis is poor in advanced cirrhosis, especially for alcoholic cirrhosis should the person continue drinking. Hematemesis jaundice and ascites are unfavorable signs. Elevated blood pressure in the portal vein, called portal hypertentions, is a common complication of cirrhosis. As a consequence, blood pressure increases within the spleen, causing enlargement of the spleen or splenomegaly and blood bypasses the liver producing ascites or esophageal varices, which are abnormally dilated and twisted veins or arteries. Hemorrhage of exophageal varices often requires emergency treatment. If cirrhosis is not treated hepatic failure and death result
SUNSHINE
06/30/06
Liver blood tests coming back abnormal? Alcohol abuse?
I have had several AST, ALT and GGT blood tests come back elevated. I know these can point to liver disease from alcohol abuse. How much do you have to drink to damage your liver?

I drink regularly but not heavily and never expected to have liver damage because of it? I have 3-5 drinks per week on average. Is that alot?
Rumbly
07/15/08
Reply
  Alcohol can cause you to have abnormal liver tests, but it's not the only reason. Other common reasons are obesity, diabetes, a high level of lipids (fats) in the blood), infection (e.g. hepatitis). It can also be an effect of many medications.
lab rat
07/15/08
can you get hepatic encephalopathy with auto-immune hepatitis. I also have primary biliary cirrhosis?
emergencywoody
04/24/06
Reply
  Yes. Encephalopathy occurs when the toxins can't be broken down and expelled out of the body. They build up in the body, more specifically the brain. Lactulose is given to bind with the toxin and to promote you to expel it from your body (in the form of diarrhea). You can get encephalopathy from any kind of liver disease.
tikizgirl
04/24/06
Why is secondary liver cancer from the colon so hard to treat?
My friend's Dad has received bad news about liver cancer and she's having a hard time processing the information.

I've looked on google but I cannot find something that simply explains why liver cancer (secondary) is so hard to treat.

Her Dad has two small spots on his liver and feels good but there are no treatments for him left. His CEA is very high (100+). She's struggling with understanding why two small spots cannot be treated. Anyone have an articles online that explains it?
GoddessofCoughSyrup
12/11/09
Reply
  He does not have "liver cancer" but metatstatic (Stage IV) colon cancer. The spots in the liver are colon cancer cells, not liver cancer cells. Yes it seems trivial, why not just operate and take them out, but many years of experience has shown us that this treatment is futile. The patient is put at risk during the operation and his life will not be lengthened at all by removing the two spots. The two spots you see on the imaging are only the tip of an iceberg; there are many more cancer cells growing and spreading, and we can not operate to remove them all.
Your friend's father will almost certainly die of colon cancer, but no one knows when. There are some very effective treatments for Stage IV colon cancer that can let him live a productive and happy life for a few years. My advice is to get the very best care he can and to live every moment he has left as well as he can. You can play a part in this too, help your friend through this, tell her to cherish every moment she still has with him. Take trips, throw parties, bake cakes, celebrate his life, and live! Good luck to you all.
Laurent
12/12/09
Do patients with Ulcerative Colitis have faster progression of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis?
My husband has just been diagnosed with PSC. He has had UC for over 10 years. In December 2007, routine blood tests found increased levels of billirubin among other discrepancies and he displayed jaundice so the doctor ordered extra tests in the ensuing months. He was taken off Azathioprine around March with no change in blood tests. Then he had an MRI and a liver biopsy only a couple of months ago and both returned negative results so we were at a loss as to the cause. A different doctor put him on Ursofalk and ordered another MRI and a CT which were performed a couple of weeks ago and it shows PSC with signs of cirrhosis already. I may not be a doctor but this seems like very rapid progression for a usually slowly progressing disease. Does the UC meds or history cause a quicker progression of the disease? What is the expected progression from here? Thank you :)
Lavendula
07/23/08
Reply
  If your husband had PSC and has been
diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver...I
would ask to be referred to a
Hepatologist that is connected with
a Transplant Center.

Cirrhosis of the liver is a very serious
disease, you can read about it here:
http://www.emedicinehealth.com/cirrhosis/article_em.htm

Let me explain this further: Usually
liver disease starts out as inflammation
of the liver cells. When the inflammation
continues for a certain period of time,
it can cause the death of the liver cells that
form scar tissue inside the liver and this
scar tissue blocks the flow of blood and
nourishment and oxygen from reaching
the healthy cells that are left and they can
die also. When cirrhosis develops, they
can only try to slow down the progression
of the cells being destroyed. Some people
can live for years with cirrhosis and others
are not the fortunate and will advance in
the disease much faster. PSC is an
auto immune disease of which they have
not found out the true cause of the disease
and there is no cure. Usually, the bile
ducts are twisted and strictured and cause
the bile to back up into the liver and can
cause liver damage. Ulcerative colitis is known to go hand in hand with PSC.

I am posting a site on transplantation also.
This is not to scare you, as you may not
need this right away, but to help you if
this disease keeps progressing:
This site will tell you much that you need
to know to have your husband evaluated
to be placed on the transplant list.
http://www.surgery.usc.edu/divisions/hep/patientguide/index.html

The liver is a very quiet organ as far as
showing signs or symptoms that something
is wrong. It usually does not show these
signs until the liver isn't able to perform
the functions that the liver cells does,
efficiently. Being jaundice is that first
sign that usually appears. In some patients
PSC doesn't progress fast, in other patients
they can go into liver failure faster...it
all depends on the patient themselves and
how their chemistry is.

I am posting this website that will inform
you more about cirrhosis and people there
are very caring and helpful to caregivers
and each other.
It is a group for people who have
cirrhosis of the liver. You will find answers
to your questions faster here and there
are links you can go to from this site. The
joining and posting on this group and everything is free. You can just read or
post if you feel like it.

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/livercirrhosissupport/?tab=s
abijann
07/24/08
Once you have Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, is it for life or is there a cure or reversal?
Does it continue to progress over time eventually causing liver failure?
Angel in Captivity
08/09/08
Reply
  There are different stages of Non Alcoholic
Fatty Liver disease. Some times people can
have fat around the outside of the liver and
it does not affect the function of the liver at
all. Others have fat that builds up in between
and in the cells of the liver and this causes a
problem. Some people are placed on a diet,
and this decreases the fat inside the liver and
it can reverse and the liver can heal.
Let me explain this clearer: The extra fat pushes
on the insides of the cells and places them
under stress. It is like going into a small room.
You have plenty of room while you are in their
yourself. Then others start to come in and as
they continue to come it...you are backed up
against the corner of it. Soon you are not able
to move around, your cannot get nourishment,
oxygen you need, and you will die unless you
can get through...which is now almost
impossible. That is what happens in the
liver cell. The fat blocks the things the cell
itself needs to exist and it also pushes the
nucleus of the cell out of position. The cell
becomes stressed, it can no longer function
the way it once did and it can die. What makes
it even worse on the cell...is when the cells
are damaged, it signals the immune system
to respond and that causes inflammation to
develop in the liver also and even more, faster
damage can happen then.

Follow closely anything the doctor may tell
you to do for your condition. Whether it
be losing weight or taking medication for
any inflammation that may develop or whatever
causes the liver to be this way.
If the condition can be reversed, he will see
this on future blood work you may have done.
Once the liver reaches the point that inflammation has progressed to the point that
the cells of the liver die off...this can lead
to an incurable disease known as cirrhosis
of the liver. It is best to catch this early on
so it can be reversed before getting to this
point. Cirrhosis is scar tissue that forms in
the liver because the cells start to die off.
This scar tissue can block nourishment and
oxygen from getting to the healthy cells and
they can die also.

So the answer to your question is that sometimes it can be completely reversed and
other times it may progress onward depending
on whether it is treated in time.

Here is a very good link to learn more about
this disease
http://www.medicinenet.com/fatty_liver/article.htm
abijann
08/11/08
Could somebody explain to me simply what gastrointestinal surgery is?
Somebody i know was supposedly going to have this operation. I just wanted to know what it was. She apparently had PBC (Primary Biliary Cirrhosis)? a bit of info would be nice!
Cheers.
Barbie Doll Tilly
07/08/09
Reply
  gastrointestinal(GI) surgery just means that they are doing surgery on a part of their digestive system.

Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a disease characterized by inflammatory destruction of the small bile ducts within the liver.

So if they has something wrong with her liver and thats why they are doing the surgery then I would assume that they would be performing surgery on their liver. Typically a surgeon would not refer to a surgery on the patients liver as a GI surgery so I would think that there is something else going on.
~*~Kellbell~*~
07/08/09
Do YOU think that Hepatitis C can be "cured?"?
There is a big controversy about if you've been not detected after treatment that you are cured. Some people say not, that it's just in "remission." MY belief, having hepc, I believe that there is a cure....The standard tx for hepc is Interferon shots and ribavirin pills. There is a new tx that just came out named telaprevir that is a protease inhibitor that works directly on the virus to kill it....another is called Boceprevir (that won't be out for a while yet as it hasn't gotten FDA approval). These drugs are very promising for genotype 1 patients that have failed current treatment. I was on the standard treatment for 63 weeks from hell and came back detectable after 3 weeks of being off treatment. I only had a 40% chance of a cure. With the Telaprevir, that statistic goes up to a 77% cure rate. I'm hoping to start treatment again by the first of the year so my body and mind can have a rest between treatments...

I looked in the archives about hepc and found some interesting things...I want you all to know that the following is NOT TRUE...you can get Hepc ONLY from blood or blood borne objects from someone with hepc...it is rarely transmitted through birth of a child however, maybe 6% or so....you would think it would be more often....anyway, the following is from Yahoo Answers archives...Please read this misinformation....it is ALL untrue.

"Hep C is not a disease that is life threating, but you have to now be extra cautious to not let any of your bodily fluids transfer to others. Hep C is a strand of the disease that occurs before you were born. Usually on of your parents had it. When i was small I took a drink of my father's drink [who has Hep C], but luckily I never got a strand it. You may not be as lucky with one of your loved ones."

HepC CAN be life threatening...you could end up with fibrosis that turns to cirrhosis and possibly to cancer and then liver failure. Hopefully with the new meds coming out, the cure rates will be much higher than before...that's what the clinical trials said anyway.

My original question (and I'm sorry for getting lost along the way) is: DO YOU THINK THAT THERE IS A CURE FOR HEPATITIS C? Just a poll really, to see what you all think....Thanks for listening!
All I have to say to the good doctor who was the first one to reply to my question is "WHAT THE HELL?" I have absolutely no idea of where you're coming from. The only "herb" my liver transplant doc wants me to take is milk thistle as it's supposed to "protect the liver" ...it won't cure you by any means. I understand that there are natural things that you can take to "cure" other things but so far there is nothing like "herbal remedies" to CURE HepC, only medications.
Barb
05/27/11
Reply
  The FDA approval for protease inhibitors for treating hepatitis is much needed good news for obtaining an undetectable sustained viral load. Without protease inhibitors (boceprevir and teleprovir), the success rate for treating genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (the most common in the US) was 45%. In clinical trials, we have seen the success rates go to 70%-75%!

Good luck, the odds look pretty good for you.
Bobo
05/28/11
Metastatic liver cancer- am looking for medical center that does the most research in that area?
I contracted colon cancer about three years ago and had it removed by resection. This was followed by chemo using oxiplatin anf FU-5. I faired really well except for neural damage in feet. Now a spot has appeared in the upper portion of my liver which is metastatic from the colon. A local liver surgeon is planning a resection and this will undoubted be followed by more chemo. I understand the real risk is from other seedlings of the cancer which may now start to appear either in the liver or other organs and that my defenses will be really low to fight them. I am looking to find the research center who most commonly deals with metastatic colon cancer to learn as much as possible about new techniques, drugs, or whatever. I might go there for the surgery or at a minimum get a second opinion on procedure etc.
fred y
09/25/06
Reply
  stanford medical center- plus u should get hold of sales reps from genentech and see if they have new study going on that is specific for liver cancer.
♦cat
09/25/06
High ammonia level with a normal liver function test?
My grandmother originally started off with breast cancer about two years ago. She now has it in her bones, and some spots on her liver. She had a GI bleed approximately six weeks ago, and has been in the hospital since. Her ammonia level is awful at 147. They have ran a liver function test, and they didn't find anything. It's very frustrating. She knows things, but they don't come out. She's just very lethargic. It's getting to the point that my mother and my aunt are up at the hospital 24/7 trying to find some answers. I'm only 15, and I can't loose my grandma. I have quite a few questions. How is it possible that her ammonia level is so high, but her liver is fine? That makes no sense to me. Also; what medicines can bring her ammonia level down? She is currently on Lactalose or also called Chronulaic and xifaxan. Please help. If you don't have any answers, please keep her in your prayers.
Amber
02/23/10
Reply
  Without talking to her doctors and having reports explained nobody can give you a 100% accurate answer.
If you have been told your grandmother has 'some spots on her liver' it is most likely to mean the cancer has spread to her liver.
Lactolose is a gentle laxative (It works by drawing ammonia from the blood into the colon where it is removed from the body) and xifaxan an antibiotic.
Ammonia levels tend to rise as the liver becomes less efficient - as in liver disease, heart failure, severe bleeding from the stomach or intestines. You say your grandmother has had a GI bleed which could explain the high ammonia level.
Symptoms of a high ammonia level, such as confusion or extreme sleepiness, may be treated with a medicine called lactulose, a laxative that works by reducing ammonia production in the intestines.

So you see your beloved grandmother is being cared for properly. I am sorry she is so ill and the future does not look bright. If you go to see her hold her hand and talk to her (whether she seems confused or not). Talk about the good times you have had together and tell her about your day. She is lucky in having such a loving grand daughter.
izzy
02/25/10
My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition?
ken j
06/11/09
Reply
  All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only).
Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors.
Zambezi_Afterdark
06/11/09
Can Liver Cancer be detected through blood work?
I want to know because my Mom has recently been diagnosed with Fatty Liver probably due to Alcohol and I hope to God that it's not Cancer.

Thanks.
ddnld1990
05/13/10
Reply
  I don't understand why you would feel totally at ease knowing her liver damage is not cancer. Is it better your Mom dies prematurely from a cancerous disease or a non-cancerous disease? Both can spell early death for someone who really didn't need to die. It sounds like you KNOW you Mom is an alcoholic. Even if she doesn't want to admit it to herself, her liver is telling her the truth that can't be hidden. It is being damaged by the addiction she is engulfed in. She is in near equal chronic danger from the alcohol as having cancer if she does not figure a way to live without drinking.

The good news is that the liver will repair itself if the continual damage caused by drinking stops if all she has a fatty liver. When full blown cirrhosis develops, sorry too late to do anything. The bad news is usually without help and a great desire to change, stopping seldom happens. Cirrhosis kills 9.2 people per 100,000 normal population.( http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/liverdis.htm ) Liver cancer kills 3.0 people per 100,000 normal population ( http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5917a3.htm ). The cirrhosis number is all reasons causing cirrhosis be it alcohol or viral infection but the numbers point to the fact that it can be equally deadly regardless of the cause since the same harm is happening.

If you have any influence over her drinking, show her it's time to do something different in life if she wants to be around to see her grandchildren grow up. Remember though, the only real power you have in life is to control your own behavior. You can invite her to look at things through your eyes rather than force a change.
Rx_Mich
05/17/10
Lovastatin?
I was recently in the hospital, where they tested my liver and found the starting of damage, and took me off Lipitor. Is Lovastatin going to be any better on my Liver
blondtender1
03/04/07
Reply
  The elevation of liver enzymes by statin drugs (Lipitor/atorvastatin, lovastatin, etc) appears to be a "class effect", and if it happened with one statin it will likely happen with another.

Whether or not minor elevations in enzymes when taking statins actually represents liver injury is somewhat controversial. Talk to your doctor about your liver test results, if you might be able to safely take a statin with close monitoring, or potential alternative cholesterol lowering medications. Best of luck.
Radon
03/04/07
Is it okay to drink alcohol if you have non alcoholic fatty liver disease?
because theres a party this weekend and I never drink and I want to try some but not if it's going to mess up my liver more....
Paige
06/10/11
Reply
  No, it's not OK. Talk to your doctor about this.
Will
06/10/11
my husband is terminally ill from stage iv lung cancer that has mestastised to his liver. taking navelbine?
anybody know if anyone has had sucess with navelbine for liver tumors and what is the mortality rate wen it spreads like this
Rhea B
11/09/09
Reply
  I am sorry for your husband. Has his oncologist addressed any of this with him ?
Stage IV disease is not considered curable. It can be treated, but survival is extended modestly at best. Mortality rate is basically 100%.
Navelbine is convenient and generally well-tolerated. Perhaps 25% of patients will obtain an objective response, depending on extent of prior treatment, current disease, and current overall health.

Hope this helps

Blessings
zrepmd
11/09/09

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Status updates

chelzbabii: People on my TL who go on and on about smoking/drinking every weekend irk me...your just asking for lung cancer or cirrhosis of the liver :)
aechaa_BITEME: RT @chelzbabii: People on my TL who go on and on about smoking/drinking every weekend irk me...your just asking for lung cancer or cirrhosis of the liver :)
loc0bunny: Liver Twist: a young orphan survives the streets of old London only to die of cirrhosis. #Bookswithalettermissing
BIGMANiz313: @thahustlerr @dfndouble <== nigga look like TI wit cancer n got cirrhosis of da liver n da 4head tho @MURDAMALEASY @xtina_live @cp66
drugsreport: One of the long term effects of alcohol on your body includes the development of liver cirrhosis, hepatitis and pancreatitis
haydnadams: RT @Drawmark: New drinking game. Every time Obama gets taken to cleaners by the GOP…DRINK! Unfortunately Medicare won't cover cirrhosis of the liver #debt