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What does fluorouracil cream do?
My podiatrist prescribed fluorouracil cream after treating plantar warts.
herbivorousplant
10/03/06
Reply
  What is the most important information I should know about fluorouracil topical?

Do not use fluorouracil topical on skin that is irritated, peeling, or infected or on open wounds. Wait until these conditions have fully healed before using fluorouracil topical.

Fluorouracil topical is in the FDA pregnancy category X. This means that it is known to harm an unborn baby. Miscarriage and birth defects have been reported when fluorouracil topical was applied to mucous membrane areas by pregnant women. Do not use fluorouracil topical if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Discuss with your doctor appropriate forms of birth control before starting treatment with fluorouracil topical.

Fluorouracil topical is available in a number of strengths and forms (creams and solutions). It is very important that you use the correct form and strength. Contact your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions regarding which product to use.

Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (e.g., sun lamps) during and immediately following treatment with fluorouracil topical. Use a sunscreen with a minimum sun protection factor (SPF) 15 and wear protective clothing when sun exposure is unavoidable. Individuals with fair skin may require a sunscreen with a higher SPF rating.
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What is fluorouracil topical?

Fluorouracil interferes with the growth of skin cells. Fluorouracil works by causing the death of cells which are growing fastest, such as abnormal skin cells.

Fluorouracil topical is used to treat scaly overgrowths of skin (actinic or solar keratoses). Fluorouracil topical may also be used in the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma.

Fluorouracil topical may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

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What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using fluorouracil topical?

Before using fluorouracil topical, tell your doctor if you:

have ever had an allergic reaction to another form of fluorouracil topical (Carac, Efudex, Fluoroplex) or injectable fluorouracil (Adrucil, 5-FU); or
have dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme deficiency.
You may not be able to use fluorouracil topical, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Fluorouracil topical is in the FDA pregnancy category X. This means that it is known to harm an unborn baby. Miscarriage and birth defects have been reported when fluorouracil topical was applied to mucous membrane areas by pregnant women. Do not use fluorouracil topical if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Discuss with your doctor appropriate forms of birth control before starting treatment with fluorouracil topical.
It is not known whether fluorouracil topical passes into breast milk. Do not use fluorouracil topical without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
The safety and effectiveness of fluorouracil topical in patients younger than 18 years of age have not been established.
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How should I use fluorouracil topical?

Use fluorouracil topical exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Fluorouracil topical is available in a number of strengths and forms (creams and solutions). It is very important that you use the correct form and strength. Contact your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions regarding which product to use.

Clean the area where you will apply fluorouracil topical. Rinse well and dry the area with a towel and wait ten minutes before applying the medication.

Wash your hands before and immediately after applying this medication, unless it is being used to treat a hand condition.

Apply fluorouracil topical to the affected area with the finger tips or a non-metal applicator, smoothing it gently onto the affected skin. Use enough to cover the entire area with a thin film.

Fluorouracil topical should not be applied on the eyelids or in the eyes, nose, or mouth. Use caution when applying fluorouracil topical around the eyes, nose, or mouth.
Do not use fluorouracil topical on skin that is irritated, peeling, or infected or on open wounds. Wait until these conditions have fully healed before using fluorouracil topical.

Do not cover the area after applying fluorouracil topical. This could cause too much medicine to be absorbed by the body and could be harmful. If a covering is needed, ask your doctor if a porous gauze dressing may be used.

A moisturizer or sun screen may be applied 2 hours after fluorouracil topical has been applied. Do not use any other skin products including creams, lotions, medications, or cosmetics unless instructed by your doctor.

The reaction of the skin treated with fluorouracil topical may be unsightly during treatment, and sometimes, for several weeks after completion of therapy.

Store fluorouracil topical at room temperature away from moisture and heat.
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What happens if I miss a dose?

Apply the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the dose you missed and apply only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not apply a double dose of this medication.

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What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of fluorouracil topical is unlikely to occur. If you do suspect an overdose, or if fluorouracil topical has been ingested, call a poison control center or an emergency room for advice.
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What should I avoid while using fluorouracil topical?

Do not use other prescription or over-the-counter skin products without first talking to your doctor during treatment with fluorouracil topical. They may interfere with the treatment or increase irritation of the skin.
Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (e.g., sun lamps) during and immediately following treatment with fluorouracil topical. Use a sunscreen with a minimum sun protection factor (SPF) 15 and wear protective clothing when sun exposure is unavoidable. Individuals with fair skin may require a sunscreen with a higher SPF rating.
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What are the possible side effects of fluorouracil topical?

Serious side effects are not likely to occur. Stop using fluorouracil topical and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (shortness of breath; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, face, or tongue; or hives).

Fluorouracil topical may cause skin irritation, dryness, scaling or peeling (exfoliation), rash, and other local reactions. Eye irritation has also been reported. If these side effects are excessive or worsen with continued treatment, contact your doctor.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

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What other drugs will affect fluorouracil topical?

Do not use other prescription or over-the-counter skin products without first talking to your doctor during treatment with fluorouracil topical. They may interfere with treatment or increase irritation to the skin.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with fluorouracil topical. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

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Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist has additional information about fluorouracil topical written for health professionals that you may read.

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What does my medication look like?

Fluorouracil topical is available as a cream or topical solution with a prescription under the brand names Fluoroplex, Efudex and Carac. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

Carac 0.5%--cream
Fluoroplex 1%--cream
Fluoroplex 1%--topical solution
Efudex 2%--topical solution
Efudex 5%--topical solution
Efudex 5%--cream
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Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
croc hunter fan
10/03/06
i accidentally use fluorouracil cream(cancer drug) to treat a rash..will i get cancer because of that?
i mistakenly use fluorouracil to treat my skin rash. and i applied it to my arms and it stayed for like 2 hours..help?"
emmie
08/07/10
Reply
  It also is used to treat some noncancerous conditions in which cells are dividing rapidly, including psoriasis, genital warts, and porokeratosis (an unusual inherited skin condition causing dry patches on the arms and legs). Fluorouracil works best on the face and scalp and is less effective on other areas of the body. It also destroys sun-damaged skin cells making the skin smoother and more youthful-appearing.

Sounds pretty good to me.
april
08/07/10
Information please!?
I was diagnosed CIN 2, but after biopsy and colposcopy diagnose was CIN 1 and my gynecologist prescribe me 5-fluorouracil vaginal tablets..
I'm planning pregnancy and I'm afraid that this medication can cause sterility .. I have share experiences where CIN 1 wasn't treated at all, and my gyno prescribe me chemotherapy agent 5-FU (fluorouracil) ?!!! isn't it too much for my diagnose ??
I want to quit with this therapy because only 4 days after I use this drug I can feel side effects...I will contact my gyno of course, but I want to hear your opinion..
Thank you all !!
mina m
06/05/07
Reply
  Get a SECOND/THIRD opinion! If YOU feel like stopping then by all means stop. It is YOUR body NOT your doctors!!!

Check out the medications benefits & side effects BEFORE using! Find a good online medical dictionary or web site that lists all medications! Make an informed decision.
jennifersuem40
06/05/07
Just got done using fluorouracil on my forhead for basal cell, can I put a lotion on it now. If so, what kind?
Hacker
03/23/11
Reply
  I will ask my dad later because he is using the same treatment on his basal cells. I will ask him if he uses a lotion.

I asked him. He said he uses fluticasone proprionate cream. When he put the fluorouracil cream on (Carac) it made his face look like a mess - red patches (I saw it). He says the corticosteroid cream (fluticasone proprionate) helps. He gets quite a few basal cell cancers.

03/23/11
Is fluorouracil topical successful in erradicating HPV in post HPV treatment ?
As a chemotherapy agent, is this a painful treatment?
mw_1010
04/14/08
Reply
  Flurorouracil topical has been used successfully in the treatment of VIN (vulva intraepithelial neoplasia.. I also know that there has been some clinical trails regarding the use of Flurorouracil also know as 5 FU and Efudex.

There is no cure that will eliminate the virus. Many women do build immunity to there acquire HPV virus. Fluorouracil is a treatment for the overgrowth of cells. It can cure this overgrowth or the changes that HPV creates.

Fluorouracil is a harsh treatment that can cause some pretty raw skin of the vulva.

This group can give you an opportunity to talk to other women that have and are using fluorouracil

http://www.vaco.co.uk/

Learn some of the tips that will help you with some of the side affects of this treatment. Aldara has also been used successfully in the treatment of VIN 2 and 3.

I have used fluroruracil in the treatment of my VIN. April is also Vulva Awareness Month.

I wish you well.
tarnishedsilverheart
04/14/08
Anyone here been given 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7360127.stm

Just read this article about it causing brain damage. I've heard it can be very beneficial, and that not *all* people suffer from the side effects. I'm just wondering if it's worth it to even try. Thanks.
Vapor Trails
11/08/08
Reply
  It is a potential concern, but remember- this was shown in animals only; research is full of things that did one thing in animals, something completely different (better and worse) in humans. This may not at all explain "chemo brain" and may represent some other type of neurological damage altogether. As above, it all comes down to risks vs benefits.

Blessings
zrepmd
11/08/08
Streptozocin, 5FU (Fluorouracil), and Doxorubicin (Adriamycin)?
Has anyone been on any or all of these chemotherapy drugs? I would like to know what to expect while taking this combination. I have cancer on my pancreas and this is the combination that the oncologist has prescribed for me to take for 10 cycles (five days in a row, then two weeks off before beginning the next cycle). Thanks for your help:)
jtwb568@yahoo.com
06/18/07
Reply
  I was on Adriamycin for 4 cycles. It caused me to sleep constantly for the first 2-3 days after my first treatment. After that, it wasn't quite so bad. It never did cause me to get sick, but that could also be because the dr. had me on Emend to help with any of the nausea, etc. I didn't really have an upset stomach. It was more of an overly full/bloated feeling and I had no appetite at all for the first few days after a treatment.

Certain smells would make my stomach turn. I found that whatever foods I would eat on treatment day (I went every 2 weeks for the Adriamycin) I would not want to even see again after that. I still cannot stand the thought of orange Gatorade or apples...I had both for lunch the day of my first treatment. LOL

My hair started coming out in big chunks on day 13 after the first treatment. Within 4 days, I was down to just little tufts of hair here and there. I never did go completely bald and though my eyebrows thinned out a bit, if a person did not know me, they could not tell a bit. Looking for the positives of chemo, I told hubby at least I shouldn't have to shave my legs for awhile and wouldn't have to worry about bad hair days. Wouldn't you know, I still had to shave my legs. LOL

Keep in mind that every medicine effects everyone differently. While I was never REALLY sick from the chemo, there was another lady with me that was on the same meds and would be sick for 2 days straight. The day of my 2nd. treatment I went home, put on sweatpants and a t-shirt and sat on the couch waiting to feel bad or sleepy....NOTHING. LOL I wound up going to a high school soccer game that evening! You just don't know til you get in there.
Best of luck to you and if you need someone to talk to, feel free to email me.
JC
06/19/07
Chemotherapy dosing questions?
Patient Mary Will is to have 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 300mg/m squared. Her BSA is 1.9m squared. The concentration of 5-FU is 50mg/ml.

What is Mary's dose of 5-FU? ___________mg

What is the volume of 5-FU that needs to be added? _______________ml
sporad01
12/13/10
Reply
  Um.... 300 mg/m^2 X 1.9 m^2 = 570 mg. And.... 570 mg / 50 mg/mL = 11.4 mL....

12/14/10
How long after you finished chemo for breast cancer till your periods are regular?
Last Febuary (2006) I finished chemo for breast cancer I took the following chemos:
Brand Generic
Ellence epirubicin
Cytoxan cyclophosphamide
Adrucil 5-Fu, fluorouracil
Taxotere docetaxel
Xeloda capecitabine
Platinol cisplatin
Vepecid,VP16 etoposide
Avastin bevacizumab

How long might it take for my cycles to become regular?
conusj
05/02/07
Reply
  As stated, everyone is different...

I had bc 2x and the first time I had

Cytoxin
Oh geesh, I forget the name now..Its also known as the RED DEVIL
and something else mixed in there..

It was 9 mos

The 2nd time I had
Xeloda and something else (sorry...) can't remember and it was like 8 mos.

GB

hope you are doing okay..I am so far :)
riverstarr
05/02/07
How to get rid of condylomata accuminata?
Please, do not mention these ways:
Imiquimod, (Aldara®) a topical immune response cream which you can apply to the affected area
A 20% podophyllin anti-mitotic solution, which you can apply to the affected area and later wash off
A 0.5% podofilox solution, applied to the affected area but shouldn’t be washed off
A 5% 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) cream
Trichloroacetic acid (TCA)
Pulsed dye laser
Liquid nitrogen cryosurgery
antoniodeli
04/24/06
Reply
  The website for the comparative study of systemic interferon alfa-2a with oral isotretinoin and oral isotretinoin alone in the treatment of recurrent condylomata accuminata is listed below. You could check that out.
Messdeck Annie
04/24/06

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