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Micronase 5 mg; i tab qam 30 min ac breakfast?
Please break this down for me
Sweets
08/30/10
Reply
  Micronase 5mg, one tablet every morning 30 minutes before breakfast.

It's not a proper set of instructions. A proper 'Sig' needs the following:

An action word: Take, Instill, Apply, Insert
A number: 1, 1/2inch
A what word: Tablet/Capsule, Drop, Cream, Suppository
A where word: By mouth, Rectally, Topically, In the eye
A frequency: once daily, at bed time, three times daily
Sometimes a condition phrase: As needed

Your above instructions should read:
Micronase 5mg, i tab po qam 30min ac breakfast
And interpreted as:
Take one tablet by mouth every morning 30 minutes before breakfast.
daddyrx
08/30/10
1. She is prescribed: Micronase 5 mg; i tab qam 30 min ac breakfast?
{living right}
06/20/10
Reply
  she is supposed to take that tab every(q= frequency) am ( morning) 30 min ante cebum means before eating and in this case before breakfast.
islami
06/20/10
I've heard some diabetic medication inhibits weight loss, is this true?
I take:
20mg Glyburide/Micronase
2000mg Metformin/Glucophage
15mg Actos
tequilasquick
01/30/07
Reply
  Quite right. Metformin has been known to help overweight diabetics lose weight. It alters your taste buds and some ppl find a metallic taste in their mouth after taking it. This helps to curb food cravings. And unlike other anti-diabetic drugs like sulphonylureas, Metformin does not cause the body to produce more insulin. Insulin is an anabolic hormone...it makes the body build mass, inhibit protein and fat breakdown and causes the body to store excess sugar in the form of glycogen. Thats why its so easy to gain weight when on certain anti-diabetic drugs. On the contrary, Metformin causes the body to be more sensitive to insulin....so the body does not need to produce as such insulin. Hope that helps!
newfangled_04
01/30/07
what can i do to control blood sugar levels when Im sleeping?
My BS runs normal (below 120 ) during the day and right before going to bed. However, when I take the reading first thing in the morning it ranges between 140 and 200. Of course when I go in to have the blood work done after a 10 - 12 hour fast the readings are elevated. Ive tried two different drugs (Glucaphage and Micronase)so far from the Dr . It is really buming me out that neither meds have worked. Anybody else out there experience the same thing?
just wondering
08/13/07
Reply
  Eat earlier, less carbs, exercise after eating and experiment with eating a small protein snack before bed. I usually eat a coulple pieces of small cheese, or try some peanut butter, sometimes some small pretzels work too. Diet and exercise will lower fasting blood glucose 58% but Glucophage will only lower it about 31%. Good luck
Angelina N
08/13/07
Pharmacology homework help?
CASE 1
A patient calls the physician’s office because she is concerned that her prescription medication looks different from what she normally takes. She mentions that her co-pay was lower too.
1.What are some initial questions you should ask the patient to gather information the physician might need?

2.Critically evaluating the situation, what are three possible explanations of the difference in appearance and cost of the medication?

3.The patient describes the tablet’s appearance and the markings on it. If the physician were to ask your assistance in identifying the medication (which you would present to him/ her for verification) what are three possible sources to determine the identity of the medication?

CASE 2
A patient visits the clinic and it is determined he has a sinus infection as well as a seasonal allergies. The patient’s chart indicates an allergy to penicillin and lists current medications as atenolol. He is given a prescription for Augmentin.
1.Explain whether Augmentin is a reasonable antibiotic choice in this patient.

2.The patient is also given another medication to help with the itching of seasonal allergies. The instructions are to take ½ of a tablet before breakfast, lunch and dinner for 10 days. How many scored tablets should the patient expect to receive?

3.For the sinus pain, the patient is told to take the following medication: acetaminophen 325 milligrams, one to two tablets taken every 4 to 6 hours as needed for pain. How should this be charted using correct abbreviations?

4.The patient has been taking Sudafed and wants to know if he should continue to take it. What is your response?

CASE 3
An elderly patient is complaining of a bad cough at her yearly physical. She has recently been diagnosed with diabetes and regularly takes prescription pain medication for her arthritis.
1.She is prescribed: Micronase 5 mg; i tab qam 30 min ac breakfast
Explain how she should take this medication.

2.The patient has been taking 3x the recommended dose of Pepto-Bismol. You mention this to the patient and she does not seem concerned. She claims she needs to take more than normal because she is always constipated. What might be some causes of her constipation?

3.What are you views of her opinion to take Pepto-Bismol for constipation?

4.What might some other options be?

5.The patient claims that you should not be concerned because Pepto-Bismol is “not really even medicine”. What is your response?

6.The doctor sends her home with an Rx for 15mL of cough suppressant q8h x10d. The patient arrives home and has a calibrated tablespoon and a teaspoon. She calls the office and asks which she should use to take the medicine. What is your response?

7.How much medication should she take, given the device you recommended?
8.How often?
9.If the medication is supplied in half-pint bottles, how many bottles will she need during the 10 days?
10.The patient is nervous about taking “more medication” and asks if there is anything she should be concerned about with a cough syrup. What is your response?
CASE 4
A physician asks you to call a prescription into the pharmacy for a patient.
1.The first is for amoxicillin 250/5 mL i tsp PO BID x 10 days. The pharmacy gives the patient a 200 mL bottle of the reconstituted antibiotic. Is this sufficient, why or why not?

2.After 5 days, the patient feels better and wants to stop the medication because it is upsetting his stomach. What is your response?

3. Since the patient has suffered an upset stomach, he believes he is allergic to amoxicillin.
Would you agree? Explain your response.
lady
03/02/11
Reply
  You want us to answer all of these for you? Doesn't seem fair does it?
Truth
03/04/11
An elderly patient is complaining of a bad cough at her yearly physical.?
An elderly patient is complaining of a bad cough at her yearly physical. She has recently been diagnosed with diabetes and regularly takes prescription pain medication for her arthritis.
1.She is prescribed: Micronase 5 mg; i tab qam 30 min ac breakfast
Explain how she should take this medication.

2.The patient has been taking 3x the recommended dose of Pepto-Bismol. You mention this to the patient and she does not seem concerned. She claims she needs to take more than normal because she is always constipated. What might be some causes of her constipation?

3.What are you views of her opinion to take Pepto-Bismol for constipation?

4.What might some other options be?

5.The patient claims that you should not be concerned because Pepto-Bismol is “not really even medicine”. What is your response?

6.The doctor sends her home with an Rx for 15mL of cough suppressant q8h x10d. The patient arrives home and has a calibrated tablespoon and a teaspoon. She calls the office and asks which she should use to take the medicine. What is your response?

7.How much medication should she take, given the device you recommended?
8.How often?
9.If the medication is supplied in half-pint bottles, how many bottles will she need during the 10 days?
10.The patient is nervous about taking “more medication” and asks if there is anything she should be concerned about with a cough syrup. What is your response?
Katie
07/08/10
Reply
  My biggest concern is that some slacker medical student is trying to cheat their way through questions on a test. This individual lacks the ambition to research and think their way through the problem. The really scary part is some of these slackers get passed by cheating and then end up in some hospital being completely unqualified to provide medical care.

The internet has lots of information on drugs and the PDR has the answers as well. If you are a medical student doing rounds and preparing for questions; you are going to busted by the resident physician. Now go take a HHH SSE and two aspirin and call me in the morning.
Póg Mo Thóin
07/09/10
Can A Type '2' Diabetic Wear Out His Pancreas and Become Type '1' Diabetic?
my father had type 2 diabetes. probably for many years un diagnosed. the doctor gave him a medication called ''micronase'' which i think may have burned out his pancreas and turned him into a type 1 insulin dependent diabetic?

i myself was diagnosed with type 2 insulin resistant diabetes. i don't think i've has this disease long? possibly a year and a half. my doctor prescribed a drug called ''metformin'' to help lower my blood sugar.

what worries me is that like my father, my pancreas may wear out from producing insulin in mass quantity's?

has anyone who was a type 2 diabetic for many years, suddenly became a type 1 diabetic because their pancreas just wore out and stopped making insulin??
ElderGoth Phillip
07/30/11
Reply
  No. Starting insulin therapy after using oral medicines does not mean that you now have type 1 diabetes. The basic problem in both types of diabetes is abnormally high blood sugar levels, but the causes and manifestations can vary for each type.

Type 1 diabetes develops when antibodies destroy the cells in the pancreas that produce and secrete insulin. The body normally produces these antibodies to defend itself from foreign organisms, but they sometimes turn on specific types of the body's own cells. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the antibodies target the pancreatic cells. Most of the time, these antibodies can be identified through the examination of a blood sample. The disease usually occurs in childhood, and the few adults who develop it display this same condition. Whether a person develops type 1 diabetes as a child or an adult, however, there is almost always an absolute lack of insulin production in the pancreas. So at the time of diagnosis, individuals who have this type of diabetes require insulin therapy.

The more common type of diabetes is type 2. In fact, 90 percent of diabetics have type 2, and adults who develop diabetes almost always develop this type. It is usually caused by a combination of two things — genetic abnormalities and obesity. While some of the genetic abnormalities have been identified, researchers are still investigating others. Having said this, a small number of type 2 diabetics have neither a specific genetic abnormality or a family history of diabetes and aren't overweight.

With a few exceptions, individuals with type 2 diabetes do not require insulin at the time of diagnosis. Early in the disease process, the pancreas still has the capacity to produce insulin — just not a sufficient amount. At this stage, oral antidiabetic medicines can be used that enhance insulin secretion from the pancreas or decrease insulin resistance in the body. However, as time passes the pancreas continues to lose the ability to produce and secrete insulin. At a certain point, insulin injection becomes an absolute necessity for managing glucose levels. Some physicians are using insulin even before it is an absolute requirement to ensure optimal glucose management which signifies an excellent diabetic treatment. So insulin use among type 2 diabetics does not mean their diabetes has "converted" to type 1.

Hope this helps.
syl c.
07/30/11
I need help with a case study in Pharmacology?
An elderly patient is complaining of a bad cough at her yearly physical. She has recently been diagnosed with diabetes and regularly takes prescription pain medication for her arthritis.

1.She is prescribed: Micronase 5 mg; i tab qam 30 min ac breakfast
Explain how she should take this medication.

2.The patient has been taking 3x the recommended dose of Pepto-Bismol. You mention this to the patient and she does not seem concerned. She claims she needs to take more than normal because she is always constipated. What might be some causes of her constipation?

3.What are you views of her opinion to take Pepto-Bismol for constipation?

4.What might some other options be?

5.The patient claims that you should not be concerned because Pepto-Bismol is “not really even medicine”. What is your response?
Sweets
08/19/10
Reply
  Critical thinking questions again.

Email your answers to me if you want and I'll go over them with you.
daddyrx
08/19/10

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